Reviews For Five Voices

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Reviewer: Virodeil (Signed)
02/06/11 - 05:13 am
A Voice of Wisdom

Awwh. Where are the two other pieces? :uncertain: You mentioned five... I would really love to read the rest... It has been an enjoyable ride so far, and I would like to hitchhike till the end. :)

 

Are you certain, though, that the ancestors of Gimli were the ones killing Elu? Were the folks of Durin not residing in the Blue Mountains and Moria? Or were you refering to the notion that Belegost and Nogrod were in the (drowned part of) Blue Mountains?

 

Regardless, I am glad that you here, once again, developed Celeborn's character well. I enjoyed seeing from his point of view. It was a surprise, though, that it was he who prepared the gifts and not Galadriel. Those were thoughtful gifts... (Not that I consider him mindless compared to Galadriel.) And the Vial of Light was from Galadriel. Did Celeborn ask Galadriel to bestow Frodo with some kind of handy illumination? (Ehh. A good idea for a vignette... The plot bunnies are hopping loose...)

 

I hope you update the collection soon. Who would Sam meet next? Faramir? Would he meet an important Elf when he journeyed to the Lonely Isle?

 

Rey

 



Author's Response:

Hey Rey,

Thank you for leaving such nice reviews! Unfortunately I do not have much time left to write and I hadn't come around to finish it so far the past three years. But to give myself that nudge, I signed up for a writing challenge and should finish the last two.

Are you certain, though, that the ancestors of Gimli were the ones killing Elu?

I don't think that I am saying that Gimli's specific ancestors killed Elu Thingol, however the dwarves of Nogrod ánd Belegost (the home of Gimli) were in Menegroth around that time. The Belegost (after Beleriand was destroyed that realm survived as far as I know) dwarves tried to talk the Nogrod dwarves out of plotting a revenge on the king, but I can imagine that - following your impression - Celeborn might still hold those of Belegost/Blue Mountains responsible for the slaying of his lord.

 

It was a surprise, though, that it was he who prepared the gifts and not Galadriel.

To me, he was in charge of this during this vignette, but as a lord, to me he delegated the assignments after he gained insights into their fates and characters during the initial meeting.

:) Have you nurtured those plotbunnies?

 

Who would Sam meet next?

Dreamflower's specific request was elves, so no Faramir. I will let you know one detail, as the series started with a birth, it will end with Samwise's journey to Valinor. Two more characters will meet him... now I better start to write!

Thanks again for your wonderful review, it was such a joy to receive them!

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Reviewer: Virodeil (Signed)
02/06/11 - 04:21 am
A voice of reason

Ah! So you used the story from the previous piece for this. A neat trick. I thought the pieces would be... well, separate from one another. This was a pleasant surprise.

 

I wonder, though, what did Glorfindel's sharp gaze/something have to do with what Sam was experiencing? I did not comprehend that point; and as I understood it, it was supposed to be the centre of the piece.

 

I enjoyed reading about Glorfindel here; how you tied the present to his past, and the experiences he had gathered throughout the long years. It lent him a rounded character, thus making this piece livelier -- in that the interaction was quite life-like. Now I wonder who is next...

 

Rey



Author's Response:

Yes, even though the vignettes are brief insights of that moment and should hopefully show Samwise's character development, they are all linked together with a few themes. The challenge was young and old, using five adjectives, one for every vignette, and it had to be Samwise meeting elves. Pfew, what a puzzle, but I am quite enjoying it! If I only had more time to write!

I wonder, though, what did Glorfindel's sharp gaze/something have to do with what Sam was experiencing?

To me yes, the reborn Glorfindel to me can read people quite well, during the battle against the Witchking of Angmar he spoke of a prophecy, so to me he is no ordinary elf. I imagined him as a war-veteran trying to calm and bring reason to an unexperienced young hobbit who had gone through a rough time.. I am glad it worked!

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Reviewer: Virodeil (Signed)
02/06/11 - 04:11 am
A voice in the Wilderness

Interesting. So Gildor was the person who gave Sam his name? But then how did he, an Elf, know of the naming customs of hobbits? Well, I guess he must have a good grip on Westron too to properly name the lad... I seemed to recall a particular meaning of Sam's name somewhere in the Appendices of The Lord of the Rings, and it was not too good, so I wondered why his mother would say that the name was good. (But possibly, she was too smitten by the Elf to say anything.) The event, that the hobbit-woman gave birth alone in the wilderness, was odd, but I consider it a fresh view on hobbit life. -- And it was an interesting gapfiller, too, and now I know why Sam was so enamoured with the Elves. :) He was aided and blessed by one when he was a newborn!

 

And now this curious reader is hopping to the next piece...

 

Rey



Author's Response:

But then how did he, an Elf, know of the naming customs of hobbits?

Quite simple, the route to the Grey Havens always went past or through Hobbit territory. I re-read the bits where the Hobbits meet Gildor for the first time when the four are trying to find their way to Rivendell and the elves knew of their customs and such. To me that also means having knowing naming customs. During that particular chapter, it was very clear to me that the Gildor and his company had a good grip of Westron since they talked and sang songs...

The event, that the hobbit-woman gave birth alone in the wilderness, was odd, but I consider it a fresh view on hobbit life.

I will admit that given Samwise's family and background, I treated his mother like any peasant woman during medieval times would respond when they were expecting a child: it is known that children were born in the fields or on the wayside of a road. From reading and re-reading Samwise bits in Lord of the Rings for this vignette series, they did not have the luxury of missing out on work, just as during medieval times women then simply gave birth in such a manner if labour had advanced so quickly and there was no hut nearby.  Samwise was the 5th child of Hamfast and Bell and biologically speaking usually the more children you give birth too, the faster labour goes. I took the liberty to write & portray Bell as a woman who got surprised on the fields by a very quick labour process. Thank goodness for Gildor to the rescue!

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